Thursday, October 4, 2007

The flex work week

One of the more interesting ideas I heard at the Capitol during this year's session was the concept of a flex-week to help cut down on traffic and pollution.

There are a few ways to achieve this. You can have employees work longer days, but fewer of them in a pay period, meaning they don't have to drive to work those days. You can also stagger start times to spread out the rush hour.

Ironically, the study committee is meeting next Tuesday at 9 a.m. at the Capitol in Atlanta, which means attendees will have to fight (and contribute to) rush hour traffic to get there.

From the press release:
The committee will study the impact a flexible work week would have on traffic congestion and the air pollution produced by the congestion. The committee will examine the issue to determine if there are further steps the state of Georgia can take to reduce traffic congestion by encouraging businesses to allow employees to work the same amount of hours in a week or two, but in fewer days. If fewer cars were on the road during the week, then congestion and air pollution would be decreased. In addition, it is likely that productivity and employee morale will increase as well, providing additional incentives to employers.

The committee will study the implementation of flexible work weeks by state agencies, and if necessary request Georgia state agencies to do everything possible to offer employees the opportunity to utilize flexible work week options. “We have piloted this program in our office at the capitol for several months, and production and employee morale have both benefited,” said (state Rep. Earl) Ehrhart. “We were able to take two cars off the road at least one day a week, and that multiplied all over the state could possibly make a substantial impact on traffic congestion.”

UPDATE from the comments: Rep. Erhart weighs in:
I enjoy your blog. What better way to incentivize legislators on such a committee into solving the problem, than ensuring they have to endure the problem just to have a meeting?

I didn't see anything after "I enjoy your blog." But I will say that, regardless of meeting time, if these folks can ease traffic in Atlanta — even just a little — without spending tens of billions on concrete, that's about the hugest small thing a legislature can accomplish.

2 comments:

earl said...

Travis,

I enjoy your blog and read it often.

What better way to incentivize legislators to solve a problem, than by having them experience it just to have a meeting?

earl said...

Travis,

I enjoy your blog. What better way to incentivize legislators on such a committee into solving the problem, than ensuring they have to endure the problem just to have a meeting?

Earl Ehrhart